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    STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN EXCERPT

                    FEB.1st.'63.

Dear Vic & Gladys [Silver]:
          Glad you got a few laughs out of 'MAD' magazine.
Interesting about the 'TARZAN ROPE' idea - should be attractive to the kids if you can find some means to demonstrate it to them.
           Enclosed some more gadget ideas (was in the Sunday paper ad section).

The first issue of MAD was far from a success, but by the fourth issue—with its "Superduperman" parody of Superman—MAD started to gain popularity. Thereafter, MAD lampooned and parodied many of the comics with whom it shared newsstand rack space, including Tarzan, which MAD affectionately re-titled "Melvin of the Apes." —Editor

 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.1st. 1963. Profile
Dear Glenn Laxton:
          Thanks yours 27th. ult.
I got a big kick ,your explanation of resting at hone for awhile, Our mutual friend 'Razz' Barry has evidently disturbed you - I have never met him personally, but I imagine he's quite a character & very unpredictable - I assume you are not on a regular vacation & will soon be returning to the College - an sure you can't wait to get back.!!
          Note Dennis King was in Town recently, I have'nt seen him since "Fra Diavalo" film, except a couple of times on Tv. He sure has aged, a real old man now.
          Yes, the old timers are disappearing fast unfortunately - I knew Al St. John very well for many years also 'Ole' Olson, we corresponded occasionally during his recent trip Abroad.
          No, I never had any desire to be a legitimate actor – all my family were on the Dramatic side of Show Bus. except my Dad, he was a character comic in Dramas in his earlier years –I guess I followed his footsteps in this respect – straight acting never interested me for some reason, probably knew I was'nt cut out to be a Gable or Cary Grant – with a puss like mine plus a lisp I knew I did'nt qualify! Can you imagine STANLEY LAUREL as "McBETH"!!
          Re the price for accomodations here, suggest you write to Mr Marvin George the manager - there are many 'Mote1s' in this area that are very nice & of course much cheaper rates by the day or week etc.
          The reason we left the Hal Roach studio – our contracts expired – unfortunately at the other studios we had no jurisdiction in the stories or the making of the films, we were treated with indifference & not allowed to voice even an opinion – a very unhappy experience for us & very demoralizing after all the years of success. Tragic to us. I hear from Mrs Hardy occasionally, you probably know she re-married sometime ago,
          All for now,
          Bestest from us both here.
                    Cheerio!
Stan Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.

Dennis King (1897–1971) was an English actor and singer. He emigrated to the USA in 1921 and went on to a successful career on the Broadway stage. Although Laurel and Hardy were the stars of "Fra Diavolo," King played the title role. | Al St. John (1893–1963)—in his persona of Fuzzy Q. Jones—defined the role and concept of "comical sidekick" to cowboy heroes from 1930 to 1951. | Ole Olsen (1892-1963) and Chic Johnson (1891-1962) were American comedians of vaudeville, radio, motion pictures and television. Their most famous concept, "Hellzapoppin'," has become show-business shorthand for freewheeling, anything-goes comedy. It enjoyed a lengthy run on Broadway and spawned a movie version.—Editor

 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.2nd.'63.
My Dear Eleanor Weaver:
          Thanks your interesting letter 1st.inst.
Sorry so long in acknowledging your last, of Dec. 29th.ult, Haven't been feeling too well, hence the neglect in attending to any correspondence - know you will understand - I fully agree with your re-action to "Utopia" film, it was very very bad, this was made in France in 1950. under very difficult circumstances, we were surrounded by a mixture of foreign Nationals, French & Italian, so we were greatly hampered by the language barrier, it was an impossible situation in every respect & a very unhappy experience for us - adding to this, I took very ill, ended up in the American Hospital in Paris - major operation - eight weeks, dropped from 168lbs. to 114. the picture had practically all to be made yet - I was still in no condition to work, so weak could barely stand up - had a nurse & Dr. on the set throughout the film - Shots to help me keep going - believe me it was really a nightmare - the film was scheduled 12 weeks shooting time we took exactly 12 months. I was too ill to take any interest in the editing etc. never thought it would ever be released, I was really ashamed of it. This will always remain a tragic memory to me.
          Thanks again for your kindly interest,
          Trust alls well & happy.
                    Sincerely always,
Stan Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.

P.S. MRS L sends her kindest regards.!
 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN EXCERPT

                    FEB.4th.'63.

Note Blackhawk's change of address - re Jimmy Finlayson, he died in 1953. Billy Gilbert is still active - mostly in night clubs & various theatrical productions. I heard the 2nd issue of the L&H comic book is on sale now. if they have "Busy Bodies" or "Towed In a Hole." I think you'd like either of these.

Jimmy Finlayson, master of the "slow burn" appeared as a foil to Stan and Ollie in many Laurel and Hardy two-reelers and features. In recent years, his familiar "D'oh" was said to be the inspiration for Homer Simpson's similar expression of disdain. | Billy Gilbert, also has a famous cartoon connection—a regular on the Roach lot, he also found fame as the voice (and uncontrollable sneezing) of Sneezy in Walt Disney's original animated classic, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves." —Editor

 

OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.9th.'63. Profile
Dear Ferndoc McFink [Richard Sloan]:
          Thanks yours, 6th.inst with enclosure your album. Looks OK to me Richard - frankly am not an authority on this type of work.
          I too think this Cuba investigation business is a lot of nonsense & a waste of valuable time - obviously the Republicans are doing all they possibly can to belittle Kennedy in their effort to win the '64 election - This Canadian situation too is ridiculous, am afraid Senor Diefenbaker stepped on his own neck.! Quite a novelty.
Have'nt heard from RAZZ BARRY, as yet re your talk on the phone - he did however send me a tape recording of a couple of interviews he made on the air (Radio) I understand a discussion about L&H - have'nt heard it as yet, so do'nt know much about it. I did'nt know he met Dennis King, guess he'll tell me about that in his next letter.
          Note you did'nt hear from Tom Sullivan - why do'nt you get that picture copied from the L&H book (ZEROX SYSTEM) very simple & a perfect reproduction. Have seen "I'm Dickens - Fenster" once or twice did'nt pay much attention to the opening music - frankly, I could'nt care less, that Marty [Ingels] guy annoys me, tries so hard to be funny, quite boring personality. My letters to Chuck [McCann] since he left W.P.I.X. I addressed to his home, so am sure he recd. them OK. anyway, I know he's plenty busy. Re the Harmon Cartoon series, all I know is, N.B.C. cancelled the deal when they saw the pilot, now he's trying to get a syndication deal - I have'nt seen an inch of the film, but I'm sure they're pretty bad - I think he was afraid to let me see the pilot - you never heard an Englishman swear did you?!! he (did'nt tell me why N.B.C. turned the deal down - I read it in the "Variety" - no explanation. Re "Sons of the Desert" idea - I did'nt say I disliked it - I only wonder WHY!!.
          We are finally getting some rain - very welcome. Not much else Richard.
          Cheerio - God Bless.
                    As ever:
Stan Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.

John George Diefenbaker (1895–1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957–1963). | "I'm Dickens, He's Fenster" was a 1962-63 sitcom about two young blue-collar carpenters: the married one Harry Dickens (played by John Astin), and the bachelor Arch Fenster (played by Marty Ingels). Ingels would later marry Academy Award winner Shirley Jones (and TV's Mrs. partridge on "The Partridge family"), while Astin would find fame as Gomez Addams in "The Addams Family" (1964-66). —Editor

 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.12th.'63.
Dear Irene [Heffernan]:
          Enclosed a few stamps for your collection - hope you'll find some new ones you have'nt already got.
          Eda joins in love & kind thoughts to Jim & your sweet self.
          Trust alls well.
          Bye - God Bless.
                    As ever:
Stan Signature
 

STAN LAUREL POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.13th.'63. Profile

Thanks Bob & Marie [Hatfield} for the lovely Valentine Card - appreciate your kind thought - hope you both & Mother enjoyed a happy day - I assume you celebrated, throwing lamb hearts at each other.!! I think the Irish custom is to throw IRISH CONFETTI (Red Bricks.)!
          We're sure having a lot of weather here, makes you feel like screaming - MOTHER!! I'D RATHER DO IT MYSELF!
          Love & bestest from us both here.
          Trust alls well.
                    Bye - God Bless.
Stan Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.
 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.14th.'63.
Dear Steve Ward:
          Thanks your letter recd.this AM.
Pleased to note you finally got a print of "Blockheads" also some L&H posters.
          Re your questions:
          1. The reason we left the Hal Roach Studios was our contract expired - Mr Roach had decided to produce more of the sophisticated type of feature films instead of the slapstick variety - unfortunately for him & all concerned.
          2. "Pick A Star" was Mr Roach's first feature after we left, he did however request us to appear in it for two or three scenes so we returned and worked for a couple of days - I presume he thought our names on this film would add some attraction at the box office. Incidently, I never did see this film.
          No I do'nt have any of the L&H films.
          Re other film dealers, I think Mr [Thomas] Sefton could give you some information on this subject. - I believe Blackhawk have prints of "Blotto" - they have moved recently, the address is now: 1235, WEST 5th.St. Davenport, Iowa.
          Nice to hear from you again - trust alls well.
          My regards to Self & your Dad,
                    Sincerely as ever:
Stan Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.

"Pick a Star" (1937) was a musical comedy starring Rosina Lawrence, Jack Haley, Patsy Kelly and Mischa Auer, directed by Edward Sedgwick and produced by Hal Roach. Ironically, it is mostly remembered now for two short scenes featuring Laurel and Hardy. —Editor

 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.18th.'63. Profile
My Dear Johnnie [Municino]:
          Sorry delay acknowledging your nice letter 1st.inst. Hope by now you're feeling much better & have overcome the shock of your recent sad experience - I had no idea that Carmela had been confined to a wheel chair for so many years - she certainly had a lot of courage & marvelous spirit, bless her, she deserves a lot of admiration, she always sounded so cheerful during our phone chats.
          Do you see Chuck McCann, have written him a couple of times but have'nt heard from him, I know his L&H program was off the air, sincerely hope alls going well for him. I have'nt heard from Jack McCabe either, not since he got married to that attractive Latvian Gal, I guess he busy with his home work.!
          Evidently you decided not to go into the hospital again - hope you are not taking any chances in not taking the Dr's advice - its not what it can do for you but its what - MOTHER !!! I'd rather do it myself.!!! Oh my Sinus.!! Does she or Does'nt She.??.
          Eda joins in love & kind thoughts to Mary, Albert & Self.
          Take care Johnny, God Bless.
                    As ever:
Stan "Mona" Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.

Stan references several popular advertising campaigns in this humorous letter to Sons of the Desert founding member John Municino including, "Mother, Please! I'd rather do it myself!" for pain reliever Anacin; "Does she or doesn't she? Only her hairdresser knows for sure," for Clairol hair color; and "Mona!" for deodorant Right Guard. The Right Guard TV commercial featured a hapless fellow standing at his bathroom sink medicine cabinet crying out for his wife, Mona. His neighbor, played by Chuck McCann, humorously greets him on the other end of his medicine cabinet with a cheery, "Hi, Guy!" —Editor

 

STAN LAUREL POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.19th.'63.

Thanks Ron [Miller] for the Wax Museum brochure - Have seen several pictures of the L&H figures - very disappointing to say the least. Anyway, appreciate your kindly interest & trouble in sending this.
          Mrs. L. joins in regards & best - trust alls well.
                    As ever:
Stan Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.
 

OCEANA LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.27th.'63.
Dear Louis Sabini:
          Thank you for your very nice letter - nice to hear from you & to know the old L&H films are still affording you so much pleasure.
          Note you have several of our movies in 8mm size also a copy of the L&H book, glad you enjoyed & found it interesting - regarding "Babes In Toyland," that film has since been retitled, it is now called "The March of the Wooden Soldiers" - I do'nt think you can get a print in 8mm - ONLY 16mm Sound version - Blackhawk I believe have a copy of the latter size.
          Am enclosing you a little picture for your cork board.
          Thanks again Louis for your nice letter so kindly expressed.
          My regards & best to yourself & Family - trust alls well & Happy.
          Good luck - God Bless you.
                    Sincerely:
Stan Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.

P.S. Thanks for the drawings - very cute.!
 

POSTCARD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.28th.'63. Profile

Thanks Dean [Kaner], yours, 24th.inst. I saw the Victor Borge show - Marcel Marceau was excellent - enjoyed his performance very much. The article you mention is incorrect - Joe Laurel is not my Brother - I have no living Brothers. This Joe Laurel is a night club entertainer - we are not in any way related.
          Hope by now the weather is getting warmer you must have had a miserable winter.
          Bye now - trust alls well with you & yours,
                    Sincerely as ever :
Stan Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.
 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.28th.'63. Profile
Dear Richard [Sloan]:
          Thanks yours, 24th.inst. enclosed in Mona Laurel's mug picture - got a terrific bang out of it - so unexpected.! where on earth did you get this? if possible would like to have a few copies of this - shall of course pay for them let me know.
          No I did'nt hear that Youngson was putting out another film documentary of the early comics - note he dug up "Lucky Dog" the very first time Hardy & I worked together - that was produced by Broncho Billy Anderson - think it cost around Three Thousand Bucks - I think still owing to all concerned except that shoe string artiste Maxie Anderson. Incidently he still owes me my full [salary] for a film he made a lot of dough with "Mud & Sand" its a wonder Youngson has'nt spotted that one yet, a burlesque of Rudolph Valentino in "Blood & Sand" I was Rhubarb Vaselino.! Can't tell you much about the cartoon series - only saw a few feet - very disappointing, to be very frank: L O U S E Y. in every respect. I think Harmon was afraid to show me the Pilot film - evidently it was pretty bad. Have'nt heard from Chuck [McCann] for
sometime now, not since Xmas I think - have written him a couple of times but he must be busy or else he's afraid to get his hand stuck in a mail box & be on Candid Camera.!!
          Dick Van Dyke is doing a L&H skit on his show next Wednesday (6th.) Henry Calvin is to play Hardy - this should be interesting to see, if you get a chance tune it in - hope you rescued your younger Brother spinning around the recording room - Do'nt call him 'Old Top' it might make his head Spin.!!
          Bye Richard - Bestest from us both here:
          Take care - God Bless.
                    As ever:
Stan Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.

P.S. I returned the picture under seperate cover.!

NOTE: "Candid Camera" is a long-running television series, created and produced by Allen Funt, which initially began on radio as "Candid Microphone" in 1947. Funt's concept came to television on August 10, 1948. The premise of the show involved concealed cameras filming ordinary people being confronted with unusual situations, sometimes involving trick props, such as a mailbox that would grab someone's hand when they inserted a letter. —Editor

 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB. 28th. 1963.
Dear John Hill:
          Thanks for your interesting letter 17th.inst.
Nice to hear from you again & to know alls well with you.
          Your mention of the film "Help-Mates" brought back Happy memories of my association with my late pal Hardy - I've missed him a lot.
          I myself have'nt been too well since my stroke in '53 my diabetic situation, a touch of arthritis etc. what can I expect? & too I'll soon be 73 - guess I'm doing alright at that.!
          Trust you survived the severe climate you've been having over there - its been a long miserable winter for you all, we've been very fortunate, only a couple of days rain here in S.M. the first in over 10 months - still quite warm & Sunny, nearing the 80's again today.
          I too wish you & yours a Happy, healthy & prosperous 1963.
          Take care - God Bless/
                    As ever sincerely:
Stan Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.
 

PHOTO ENCLOSURE - FEBRUARY 28, 1963

Autographed Stan Laurel photo
 

STAN LAUREL LETTERHEAD - 849 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, CA - TYPEWRITTEN

                    FEB.28th.'63.
Dear Tim Dalton:
          Thanks yours, 24th.inst.
The Roach Studio is to open again shortly under new management, I understand it is being converted into a Rental Studio.
          Charlie Chaplin's address is: "Manoir de Ban", VEVEY.Switzerland.
          Yes, Hal Roach Jr. is living also Roach Sr.
          Enclosed picture for your Brother Mike - thanks for the request. Glad you enjoyed the L&H book & found it interesting.
          Nice to hear from you again.
          Good luck Tim.
                    Sincerely as ever:
Stan Laurel Signature
                    STAN LAUREL.

 

 

 
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